My Adventures

A Rainforest in the Pacific North West? — Hoh Rainforest

The Hoh Rainforest

The beauty of the Hoh Rainforest is exquisite; the lush green scenery, the winding river, and the animal life that roams freely make the area amazingly beautiful. Today, I walked along the river trail, which is a 17.3 mile route to the Blue Glacier. I only walked 2.7 miles out on to the trail to a waterfall along the path, and it ended up being about a 2 hour hike. Along this particular path, you can see all of what the park has to offer — the grand mosey trees, the wide river, and even a waterfall. Also, at marker .9 there is a path that leads to the river side. Luckily, the sky gave us a good sunny day for our hike in the rainforest.

It is unbelievable to think that we have this amazing rainforest here in the Pacific North West. If you get a chance, stop by for a hike here!

I adore looking up to the old, giant trees that line the Hoh River Trail

I adore looking up to the old, giant trees that line the Hoh River Trail

Moss grows from everywhere in the rainforest, covering the ground and trees.

Moss grows from everywhere in the rainforest, covering the ground and trees.

At mile marker .9 on the Hoh River Trail there is a path that leads to the river side

The other paths at the Hoh river are The Mini-trail, a .1 mile flat, paved, accessible-with-assistance loop in old growth rain forest; The Hall of Mosses, a .8 easy loop through old growth; The Spruce Nature Trail, a 1.2 mile loop through temperate rain forest to the Hoh River; The South Snider-Jackson, a 11.8 miles that ascends 3,700 feet before descending again to the Bogachiel River; and The Hoh River Trail, the 17.3 mile route to the Blue Glacier. The ranger at the visitors center explained that the hall of mosses trail is the most dramatic if you are looking for a rainforest feel.

One of the many bridges that help you across the little creeks that lead into the Hoh River. Looking up from this bridge is a waterfall; this is 2.7 miles from the beginning of the Hoh River Trail.

One of the many bridges that help you across the little creeks that lead into the Hoh River. Looking up from this bridge is a waterfall; this is 2.7 miles from the beginning of the Hoh River Trail.

If you plan on doing The Hoh River Trial, I would recommend wearing decent hiking shoes. I wore my Keens which I love! It is a rainforest, so the forest floor is wet and navigating mud puddles becomes a task of not falling into the muck. The path also goes up and down making for a bit of a challenge for a first-time hiker.

Messing around in the muck!

Messing around in the muck!

Also, be aware that there is wildlife in the park! On our way we came across an elk who was taking her time grazing in our path; it is advised not to come within 100 ft of the elk (and other wildlife). Because it is now calving season, it is not a good time to disturb the elk, but in order to get the elk to move out of our path, another backpacker made noise (throwing rocks and shouting) in order to spook the animal out of our path. I can also assure you that there will be plenty of slugs along your way — but try not to squish them!

The female elk enjoying her meal as we waited for her to leave, so we could pass in peace

The female elk enjoying her meal as we waited for her to leave, so we could pass in peace

One of the many banana slugs I came across on my hike

One of the many banana slugs I came across on my hike

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